Tag Archives: Choosing feelings

Hell has an exit.

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
• Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

Night-Sky
Connect the dots however you like. Can you connect them all?

The Serenity Prayer does not depend on belief in God, but rather expresses basic principles of life:

God, grant me
the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
the courage to change the things I can,
and the wisdom to know the difference.

This pertains to where one directs one’s attention, how one chooses to feel, and where one focuses one’s desires. These are acts not of the mind, but of the will.

Jeffrey Tayler says, “Given the possibility that terrorists may acquire weapons of mass destruction and nuclear states with faith-based conflicts may let fly their missiles, religion may be said to endanger humanity as a whole. No one who cares about our future can quietly abide the continuing propagation and influence of apocalyptic fables that large numbers of people take seriously and not raise a loud, persistent, even strident cry of alarm.”[15]

Fact: those who direct Iran’s nuclear program aren’t likely to listen to an atheist American Islamophobe.

Continue reading Hell has an exit.

“Upward”

This may seem unrealistic, even delusional; and much of the time, it has felt that way to me. But I’ve been here before, and know it’s not unrealistic at all. One drawback: it will pull me even farther away from the societal mainstream.  But if I feel a “call” toward anything at all, it’s this path that I feel called to.

Continue reading “Upward”

Victory is mine

In a blog post of July 19, 2014, I declared my ambition to become  the “Nemesis of the morning glories” in the garden out behind my church.  My plan was to spend four hours per week specifically weeding the morning glories in that garden.

On Monday, October 20, 2014, I wrote, “The morning glories are vanquished.  As of today, they are under control throughout the entire garden.”

Continue reading Victory is mine

Learning curve

Cornel West channels Martin Luther King Jr. to criticize Obama

Friday 2014-12-26

Learning happiness can take you out of your comfort zone.

So, there can be a learning curve as one comes to tolerate and manage greater degrees of happiness and prosperity than one has been accustomed to.

Some time ago, this short, very thin Korean immigrant with shoulder-length gray hair began coming to the shelter. When he first came here, he was in bad shape; he appeared to have no resources at all.

Continue reading Learning curve

Counting my blessings

Here is a short list of things I can be grateful for.

A clean sheet every night*
A clean pillow case every night*
A blanket every night*
A pillow every night*
A hot shower every night
Clean clothes available every day
A good supper every night
Financial resources: At this time, anything I want, I can get.
(Anything I can’t get, I don’t want.)
Moral support from my family, my friends and my church.  A ton of people are pulling for me, hoping for my prosperity.
The best problems in the world. (See next Wednesday’s post.)

*(To my knowledge, no other shelter in Baltimore City provides these things. If you don’t bring your own, you sleep on a bare mat. A change in that situation is something to earnestly hope for.)

Originally posted Christmas Eve 2014.

The inevitability of evil

Sooner or later, it had to happen.

Sunday, about 14:00, I had just bought my second coffee at McDonald’s.  I put it on my table and, as they require me to do, took all my things with me to go out and smoke.

Related:  Does McDonald’s discriminate against the homeless?

Outside, I took one more shot at trying to understand how evil — negativity, conflict — happens.

There are those who say that evil is necessary because without it, humans would never be able to appreciate joy.  I have never found this believable.
Continue reading The inevitability of evil