Category Archives: Thursday posts

Obama’s Christian humility

Bookmarks:
Obama’s Christian humilityImposter queen tries to seize mansionHigh speed chase with multiple carjackingsISIS beheads 20 EgyptiansWhen free speech crosses the line

Continue reading Obama’s Christian humility

Hell has an exit.

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
• Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

Night-Sky
Connect the dots however you like. Can you connect them all?

The Serenity Prayer does not depend on belief in God, but rather expresses basic principles of life:

God, grant me
the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
the courage to change the things I can,
and the wisdom to know the difference.

This pertains to where one directs one’s attention, how one chooses to feel, and where one focuses one’s desires. These are acts not of the mind, but of the will.

Jeffrey Tayler says, “Given the possibility that terrorists may acquire weapons of mass destruction and nuclear states with faith-based conflicts may let fly their missiles, religion may be said to endanger humanity as a whole. No one who cares about our future can quietly abide the continuing propagation and influence of apocalyptic fables that large numbers of people take seriously and not raise a loud, persistent, even strident cry of alarm.”[15]

Fact: those who direct Iran’s nuclear program aren’t likely to listen to an atheist American Islamophobe.

Continue reading Hell has an exit.

The limits of competence

A post of 2006-11-04 at Messiah Truth. In the larger discussion from which this is taken, I was asserting that clairvoyance isn’t necessarily all it’s cracked up to be. The borderline between what one knows and what one doesn’t know is invisible to anyone.

The limits of competence: The Edgar Cayce story …

… provides many parallels to current questions about information that purportedly comes from “Beyond” and the ways people respond to same.

Edgar Cayce was born in 1877 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He lived for substantial periods of time in Selma, Alabama; Dayton, Ohio; and Virginia Beach, Virginia. He worked as a farmer and photographer. From birth, he displayed considerable clairvoyance aside from the singular mechanism to be described below. Thomas Cayce, his father’s father, is said to have had similar skills, but I know no details. No one else in the family had similar skills or interests, except for Edgar’s mother, who is said to have at times seen the discarnates who were the child Edgar’s playmates.

Continue reading The limits of competence

Climate change is nothing new.

Bookmarks:
Climate change is nothing newRe-examining the housing bubbleHilary Swank“Super-hydrophobic” metals could mean clean latrines“Women priests” again

Continue reading Climate change is nothing new.

Rationalism cannot save us.

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
• Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

Rationalists insist that love doesn’t matter. Neither does hope. Neither does joy.

“Rational” and “rationality” refer to the activity of reason. Well and good.

“Rationalist” and “rationalism” refer instead to the dogma that one’s affect ought not be allowed to inform or influence one’s thinking. This is a problem.

Continue reading Rationalism cannot save us.

Encounters with clairvoyance

Originally posted in July 2005 at Messiah Truth; originally posted here 2015-03-04:

Religiosity can express any of various impulses, including these:
(1) Desire to placate the gods.
(2) Desire magically to assure desired outcomes. This is the essence of the Baal cult. Robert Jenson says it is also the essence of all religions except Christianity (:lol ).
(3) Desire to understand, and live in harmony with, the truth.

My earliest childhood memories are of a sense that there is more to the world than we perceive with our five senses, and of a desire to understand and correctly relate to that larger world. I have my moments or months of what some call doubt, of agnosticism or atheism, but in the end this thing always comes back. I feel it in my flesh and bones. This is ONE foundation of my religiosity.

Continue reading Encounters with clairvoyance

Belief: The unforgivable sin

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
• Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

A timely quote from Bertrand Russell:  “Zeal is a bad mark for a cause.  It suggests one is not quite certain.  It is not the vaccinationists, but the anti-vaccinationists, who are zealous.  No one is zealous about arithmetic.”

The homeless shelter where I stay makes us sit through chapel for an hour every night.  A few days ago, this new preacher addressed us for the first time.  Shortly into his presentation, he became hysterical, and stayed that way for fifty minutes.  He wept.  He screamed.  He did not persuade anyone of anything.

Jeffrey Tayler sets forth that atheism is just as settled as arithmetic; but he is just as zealous as that preacher — and just as unpersuasive.  In effect, he preaches only to the choir.

Why?
Continue reading Belief: The unforgivable sin

Hannibal, Hancock and Hitler

I have chosen to keep the alliterative title for this post, though it proves mistaken.  Below appears an e-mail exchange of August 20, 2013 between Brian Williard, O.B.M., and myself.  In his original message, Brian copied, as he often did, the program summary of a segment on Coast to Coast, a nighttime radio talk show that often deals with UFOs and other strange subjects.  The “imminent blog post” referred to appears to be “The New Age is a lot of hooey.”

Related:
Leadership, Patton and Jesus
Through a glass, darkly

Brian wrote:

I don’t know if he promotes this idea, but some believe this guy is the reincarnation of Edgar Cayce:

Continue reading Hannibal, Hancock and Hitler