Encounters with clairvoyance

Originally posted in July 2005 at Messiah Truth; originally posted here 2015-03-04:

Religiosity can express any of various impulses, including these:
(1) Desire to placate the gods.
(2) Desire magically to assure desired outcomes. This is the essence of the Baal cult. Robert Jenson says it is also the essence of all religions except Christianity (:lol ).
(3) Desire to understand, and live in harmony with, the truth.

My earliest childhood memories are of a sense that there is more to the world than we perceive with our five senses, and of a desire to understand and correctly relate to that larger world. I have my moments or months of what some call doubt, of agnosticism or atheism, but in the end this thing always comes back. I feel it in my flesh and bones. This is ONE foundation of my religiosity.

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Belief: The unforgivable sin

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
• Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

A timely quote from Bertrand Russell:  “Zeal is a bad mark for a cause.  It suggests one is not quite certain.  It is not the vaccinationists, but the anti-vaccinationists, who are zealous.  No one is zealous about arithmetic.”

The homeless shelter where I stay makes us sit through chapel for an hour every night.  A few days ago, this new preacher addressed us for the first time.  Shortly into his presentation, he became hysterical, and stayed that way for fifty minutes.  He wept.  He screamed.  He did not persuade anyone of anything.

Jeffrey Tayler sets forth that atheism is just as settled as arithmetic; but he is just as zealous as that preacher — and just as unpersuasive.  In effect, he preaches only to the choir.

Why?
Continue reading Belief: The unforgivable sin

Hannibal, Hancock and Hitler

I have chosen to keep the alliterative title for this post, though it proves mistaken.  Below appears an e-mail exchange of August 20, 2013 between Brian Williard, O.B.M., and myself.  In his original message, Brian copied, as he often did, the program summary of a segment on Coast to Coast, a nighttime radio talk show that often deals with UFOs and other strange subjects.  The “imminent blog post” referred to appears to be “The New Age is a lot of hooey.”

Related:
Leadership, Patton and Jesus
Through a glass, darkly

Brian wrote:

I don’t know if he promotes this idea, but some believe this guy is the reincarnation of Edgar Cayce:

Continue reading Hannibal, Hancock and Hitler