Tag Archives: Kendrea Johnson

Prayer for the dead

When one comes across a story like that of Kendrea Johnson[1], Victoria Martens[2] or Brian Williard[3], one may be moved by a desire to somehow help the deceased, and question what one can do, since the person is, after all, dead.

In the previous post, I said of Kendrea, “You just want to take her in your arms, hug her, and make all the darkness go away.”  Actually, you can — if, at that moment, she is willing to be embraced.  Your intuition will tell you her status in that regard at any given moment; or, may direct you at wholly unexpected times that, at this moment, that is so.  See “Following guidance.”

There is a Jewish expression, “z’l,” meaning “Zikhrono livrakha,” “May his memory be for a blessing.”  The corresponding form for a woman is “Zikhronah livrakha,” “May her memory be for a blessing.”  A corresponding Gentile expression is “O.B.M.,” “of blessed memory.”  Every time one uses such an expression, one honors the person who has passed on, and this is not without its effect beyond the veil.

[1]Related: Give up the word “deserve.”
[2]Related: Forgiving the cosmos
[3]Related: Grief and sublimation
 

2) Give up the word “deserve.”

<– 1) Do for yourself… Home 3) Get your hands dirty. –>

John C. Dorhauer’s “An Open Letter to White Men in America” begins:

Dear White Men,

You are persons of privilege.

You didn’t earn it.

This distresses me far less today than it did when I first read it.  Maybe I’ve become more comfortable with having things I don’t deserve.  More likely, I’ve lost all interest in whether people have things they don’t deserve or deserve things they don’t have.

I encourage you to lose all interest in it, too.

Continue reading 2) Give up the word “deserve.”