Podcast — Love and Order


Love and Order

Related:

Music:  The Jonas Brothers, “Sucker”

Script:

It’s The William Tell Show.  I call myself William Tell; you can call me Bill.  Thank you for including me in your world.  It’s wonderful to be included.

Our audio quality will be a bit different from now on.  The tablet I used to use to record this show, stopped working, and I’m recording using my laptop instead.  The laptop version of Anchor has no pause button on the record feature, so there may be more and longer gaps here than usual.

Today I want to continue the discussion I began last time, though I can only take it so far.  In the end, I don’t have the cosmic answers.  Hopefully I will be able to make something coherent out of this.

Well, I guess I didn’t say that much about it last time.

I was talking about the underclass, or Lumpen, and their failure to grow up.  A lot of this has to do with the amount of chaos, or hostility, or lack of love, in their world.  And chaos and lack of love appear to me to be related.  Children whose parents spend their resources chaotically wind up often not having food on their table, or lights or heat in their home.  The parents are that way because they’ve never grown up themselves; they are too disordered, or dysfunctional, or lacking in self-love, to manage their own lives, let alone manage children.

So the children often arrive at school age unable to tie their shoes or use the bathroom independently.  They are too easily distracted to be able to pay attention.  And chronic school failure is one result.

The principal cause of poverty, the principle that makes and keeps poor people poor, that has kept poor people poor for generations, the same people for thousands of years; all over the world, in Stockholm and Dublin and Berlin and Brisbane and Baltimore — has been a consistent choice of malice rather than love.  Malice expresses itself in vandalism.  These folk tend to vandalize their own lives, let alone their relationships, their homes, their families, their jobs or job opportunities; the list goes on and on.

Time for a break.

[Commercial break]

The flipside of everything I’ve just said, is that love provides order in the universe, and it is on this basis that people can create prosperity.

If I love you, and you love me, there is a bond between us, composed of love.

If each of us loves other people as well, and those persons love each of us in return, there are all these bonds among us all, composed of love.  From this, we are prone to weave a social fabric, a foundation we can build on — to build homes, schools, businesses, jobs, all those things that provide prosperity to a community.

This stands in contrast to a world where there is no love, and it’s “every man for himself.”

It all begins with love.

To build community, one begins by ordering one’s own life.  The right use of the resources you have, begins with loving yourself.  The right use of the resources you have, means you will not be in need.  Right use of the resources you have makes emotional resources available so that you can build relationships with other people.  And those branch out and spread, to build the social fabric I spoke of before.

Today’s music has nothing to do with anything.  I chose it just because I like it.  A day or two after I got to the new shelter where I’m staying now, there’s this little carry-out across the street, called The Dog House; I heard it playing in there.  I had NEVER heard it at Royal Farms.  That means I hadn’t heard this song for TWO YEARS.

I never knew anything about the Jonas Brothers until now.  The song, “Sucker,” makes me MOVE.

Though it may also express Donald Trump’s posture toward Vladimir Putin.

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